lab sculpture created by Steve Lohman

 

Postdoctoral ScholarsGraduate StudentsUndergraduate Students
Mark Schnitzer
Principal Investigator
CONTACT CURRICULUM VITAE

Mark Schnitzer is Associate Professor of Biology and Applied Physics and is an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. His research concerns the innovation of novel optical imaging technologies and their use in the pursuit of understanding neural circuits. The Schnitzer lab has invented two forms of fiber-optic imaging, one- and two-photon fluorescence microendoscopy, which enable minimally invasive imaging of cells in deep brain tissues. The lab is further developing microendoscopy technology, studying how experience or environment alters neuronal properties, and exploring two different clinical applications. The group has also developed two complementary approaches to imaging neuronal and astrocytic dynamics in awake behaving animals. Much research focuses on cerebellum-dependent forms of motor learning. By combining imaging, electrophysiological, behavioral, and computational approaches, the lab seeks to understand cerebellar dynamics underlying learning, memory, and forgetting. Further work in the lab concerns neural circuitry in other mammalian brain areas such as hippocampus and neocortex, as well as the neural circuitry of Drosophila.

Annette Lewis
Scientific Project Manager
CONTACT  

After completing postdoctoral research in neuroscience at Stanford and Genentech, Inc., I worked as a scientist and scientific manager at Entelos, Inc., working closely with both biologists and engineers to build computer based models of disease, including asthma and other inflammatory diseases. I have returned to Stanford to apply principles of scientific management to the work in the Schnitzer lab, where innovation of new brain imaging modalities involves detailed planning and coordination between several personnel with distinct areas of expertise. I also help coordinate our relationships with scientific corporations seeking to translate our inventions into the marketplace.

Alessio Attardo
Research Scientist
CONTACT  

The hippocampus is a brain structure central for encoding of declarative memory, consolidation of long-term memory and recalling of stored memory. To date, because of its location the hippocampal formation has been inaccessible for in vivo imaging studies. My interest is in using our lab's in vivo microendoscopy imaging techniques to study the mechanisms by which memory is encoded and retrieved both at the cellular and at the network levels.

Pablo Jercog
Research Scientist
CONTACT  

Much is known about neural plasticity and long-term memory at the molecular and cellular level. Our systems level understanding of learning and memory consolidation is more limited, and questions of how memory objects are encoded in neural network activity remain under debate. Using the new technology developed in the Schnitzer lab for calcium imaging in freely behaving rodents, I am studying the large-scale neural codes underlying associative learning.

Jane Li
Life Science Research Assistant
CONTACT  

I support the laboratory through a variety of research activities involving histology, circuit tracing, genotyping, husbandry, and surgery.

Jin Zhong Li
Director of Molecular Virology

CONTACT  

I have extensive expertise designing and using viral vectors for biological research, including lentivirus, retrovirus, adenovirus, and AAVs. My background includes long experience in the biotechnology industry, including at Immune Design and Genentech, where I worked in support of the viral vector core facility. In the Schnitzer lab I will design novel cell and tissue specific vectors targeted to particular neurons in the brain. These vectors will be combined with electrophysiological and optogenetic techniques to explore neural circuitry and function in behaving animals.

Joan Savall
Senior Scientist, HHMI
CONTACT  

My research career began in medical robotics in the Department of Mechanical Engineering in KULeuven, Belgium. Subsequently, I was an Assistant Professor of Machine Theory at the University of Navarra and a Researcher in the Applied Mechanics Department at CEIT, Spain. I am a Consulting Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering-Design Department at Stanford and have joined Prof. Schnitzer's laboratory to focus on the development of custom actuators to enhance surgeons’s use of our cochlear microendoscope. This project is a collaboration with Juergen Jung and Dr. Nikolas Blevins, a surgical otologist in Stanford’s Dept. of Otolaryngology.

Gaurav Venkataraman
Life Science Technician
CONTACT  

I am interested in neural computation and sensory encoding, both at the level of neural circuits and biophysical mechanisms. I did my undergraduate work in mathematics at Reed College, followed by a two year fellowship in ion channel biophysics with Miguel Holmgren at the NIH.

Yanping Zhang
Research Technician III, HHMI
CONTACT  

I have more than ten years experience in molecular and cell biology with both laboratory and clinical experience, designing and constructing cloning and expression vectors for gene expression and regulation, performing mutagenesis, protein preparation, and DNA/RNA analysis. In the Schnitzer lab, I continue to work on molecular cloning and systematic viral production.

Postdoctoral Scholars
Maggie Carr
Postdoctoral Scholar
CONTACT  

We have a remarkable ability to form memories of our everyday experiences and retrieve previously stored memories to guide our actions. My research focuses on understanding how activity in spatially distributed neural circuits can support both the encoding of relevant information and the retrieval of stored associations to guide behavior.

Yun-Sheng Chen
Postdoctoral Scholar
CONTACT  

I am interested in developing new imaging systems that will help interrelate neuronal circuit dynamics and connectivity patterns.

Yiyang Gong
Postdoctoral Scholar
CONTACT  

I'm interested in developing novel imaging techniques for investigating various biological phenomena. I will focus on improving the spatial and temporal resolution of optical imaging in order to enhance the study of neural activity.

Benjamin Grewe
Postdoctoral Scholar
CONTACT  

Understanding the underlying principles of neuronal circuit dynamics in the intact brain remains challenging. With a background in biophysics/neuroscience I am interested in developing new optical and electrical techniques to probe and manipulate the activity of neuronal cell ensembles in living animals. A goal of my research is to directly correlate neuronal activity to the animal's behavior.

Cheng Huang
Postdoctoral Scholar
CONTACT  

As a graduate student with Dr. Yi Zhong at Tsinghua University, I studied the molecular and cellular basis of olfactory long-term memory in Drosophila. In the Schnitzer lab, I will use a variety of approaches to dissect the neural circuitry underlying adaptive behavior of Drosophila. I am also involved in the effort to create massively parallel, high-throughput brain imaging technologies.

Jerome Lecoq
Postdoctoral Scholar
CONTACT  

The limited depth penetration of current two-photon imaging techniques makes it difficult to assess the involvement of deeper nuclei in sensory processing. I am interested in using the laboratory’s recent developments in microendoscopy imaging techniques to bring into focus the role of deeper brain areas during sensory processing.

Thomas Rogerson
Postdoctoral Scholar
CONTACT  

Memories are often constructed from associations between diverse pieces of information that have no intrinsic connection. By studying how disparate pieces of information are stored in relation to each other, I hope to shed light on the mechanisms by which memories are linked in the mammalian brain. This will facilitate our understanding of how higher order knowledge is extracted from multiple memories.

Mark Wagner
Postdoctoral Scholar
CONTACT  

I'm interested in the neural computations underlying motor learning and motor control, and I am studying these topics in behaving mice using our lab's techniques for brain imaging in actively moving animals.

Cheng-Hsun Wu
Postdoctoral Scholar
CONTACT  

I am interested in developing new technologies for imaging large-scale brain activity. With the knowledge in physics and instrumentation that I acquired during my PhD at MIT, I hope to shed light on previously inaccessible questions in modern neuroscience.

Bin Zhang
Postdoctoral Scholar
CONTACT  

I am interested in how the anatomy and connectivity of neural circuits shape neural dynamics. The Schnitzer lab has recently developed powerful new technologies for imaging the activity of >1000 individual neurons at a time in the brains of freely behaving mice, and I am developing approaches to understand the observed patterns of activity in the context of the underlying neural circuits.

Graduate Students
Biafra Ahanonu
Graduate Student
CONTACT  

I am interested in investigating neural circuit activity and learning in freely behaving mice using the miniature, integrated microscope technology that our lab has developed. I grew up in Arizona and then journeyed to Boston for my undergraduate training at MIT, where I studied neuroscience and biology.

Tony Hyun Kim
Graduate Student
CONTACT  

I am drawn to neural computation as a potential foil to modern high-performance computing architectures and algorithms. I am working towards new instrumentation for two-photon brain imaging. I did my undergraduate work in EECS and physics at MIT.

Lacey Kitch
Graduate Student
CONTACT  

I am interested in neural computation and in the development of tools that will allow us to better observe and analyze computational processes in living brains. My work draws on my background in Electrical Engineering, Physics, and Neuroscience.

Jesse Marshall
Graduate Student
CONTACT  

My work attempts to create optical tools towards understanding the structure and dynamics of neural circuitry in living animals and humans. These efforts draw on my longstanding passion for physics and involve broad collaboration within the Stanford scientific community.

Elizabeth Otto
Graduate Student
CONTACT  

I am interested in the development and improvement of devices used for in vivo neural imaging in freely moving animals. My current work draws on my background in biophysics and optics and is aimed at creating miniaturized fiber-optic fluorescence microscopes.

Colleen Rhoades
Graduate Student
CONTACT  

Broadly speaking, I seek to understand how memories are represented in neural codes. As a Bioengineering student, I plan to combine engineering and computational approaches with biological techniques to investigate these systems neuroscience questions.

Oleg Rumyantsev
Graduate Student
CONTACT  

My current research is aimed at development of a novel fluorescent microscope for in vivo imaging of neural activity. The challenges of my work are at the interface between physics, engineering and neuroscience.

Tugce Tasci
Graduate Student
CONTACT  

My interest is in computational neuroscience, particularly analysis of neural data obtained from one and two photon imaging, which is becoming a critical bottleneck as the complexity of data acquired from brain imaging studies increases. I specialized in signal/image processing during my undergraduate studies in electrical engineering.

Fori Wang
Graduate Student
CONTACT

I am interested in using optical tools to study circuit dynamics in awake behaving animals. My research draws on my background in neuroscience and bioengineering.

Tong Zhang
Graduate Student
CONTACT  

My work focuses on the mechatronic and optomechanical challenges involved in the massively parallel brain imaging project, as well as in the design of the lab’s tiny, portable microscopes in the 1-3 gram range.